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odditiesoflife:

Sagano Bamboo Forest, Japan

This stunning bamboo forest is located in the Arashiyama district on the west outskirts of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the most amazing natural sites in the country. An interesting fact about Sagano Bamboo Forest is the sound that the wind makes while it blows through the bamboo. Amazingly enough, this sound has been voted on as one of the “one hundred must-be-preserved sounds of Japan” by the Japanese government. Another interesting fact – the railing on the sides of the road is composed out of old, dry and fallen parts of bamboo.

odditiesoflife:

Sagano Bamboo Forest, Japan

This stunning bamboo forest is located in the Arashiyama district on the west outskirts of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the most amazing natural sites in the country. An interesting fact about Sagano Bamboo Forest is the sound that the wind makes while it blows through the bamboo. Amazingly enough, this sound has been voted on as one of the “one hundred must-be-preserved sounds of Japan” by the Japanese government. Another interesting fact – the railing on the sides of the road is composed out of old, dry and fallen parts of bamboo.

Tagged: (SCIENCE)

thescienceofreality:

This Week in Science - April 29 - May 5, 2013:

  • Smallest movie ever made here.
  • Sea horse armor inspires engineers here.
  • New insect-eye-like-camera here.
  • Bioengineered windpipe here.
  • Bionic ear here.
  • Anti-matter falling up here.
  • Harvard robotocists fly RoboBee here.
  • Saturn’s seasonal magnetosphere here.
  • Vega launches here.
  • Climate change causing painted turtles extinction here.
  • Black hole birth observed for first time here.
  • New species of mole rat here.
thescienceofreality:

This Week in Science - April 29 - May 5, 2013:
Smallest movie ever made here.
Sea horse armor inspires engineers here.
New insect-eye-like-camera here.
Bioengineered windpipe here.
Bionic ear here.
Anti-matter falling up here.
Harvard robotocists fly RoboBee here.
Saturn’s seasonal magnetosphere here.
Vega launches here.
Climate change causing painted turtles extinction here.
Black hole birth observed for first time here.
New species of mole rat here.

thescienceofreality:

This Week in Science - April 29 - May 5, 2013:

  • Smallest movie ever made here.
  • Sea horse armor inspires engineers here.
  • New insect-eye-like-camera here.
  • Bioengineered windpipe here.
  • Bionic ear here.
  • Anti-matter falling up here.
  • Harvard robotocists fly RoboBee here.
  • Saturn’s seasonal magnetosphere here.
  • Vega launches here.
  • Climate change causing painted turtles extinction here.
  • Black hole birth observed for first time here.
  • New species of mole rat here.

Study finds children with low self-esteem are often praised for personal qualities instead of efforts →

catbountry:

drtanner:

psshaw:

uprightbipedalist:

This is another one that’s just stacking up on information we’ve suspected for a while. When a child is praised for being smart or talented, it makes the stakes that much higher because they need to stay smart or talented in order to maintain their identity. Here’s the crux of this study:

“Adults may feel that praising children for their inherent qualities helps combat low self-esteem, but it might convey to children that they are valued as a person only when they succeed,” Brummelman said. “When children subsequently fail, they may infer they are unworthy.”

The west especially values this sorta-myth of inherent ability over hard work. The one upside is that it gives lazy jerks like me an out when math is revealed to be “not my thing” after the first couple tries.

This has been a huge problem for me with my own self esteem.

I always did tremendously well in school from the second I got there and had always been praised for being intelligent, creative, talented, etc., and as a result, I now suffer from extremely destructive perfectionism in just about everything that I attempt to do, ever.

Because, you know. If the things I do aren’t perfect, then I’m clearly not intelligent, creative, talented, etc., am I. 

This explains so much.

odditiesoflife:

The Terra Cotta Soldiers

In March 1974, a group of peasants digging a well in drought-parched Shaanxi province in northwest China unearthed fragments of a clay figure—the first evidence of what would turn out to be one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of modern times. Near the unexcavated tomb of Qin Shi Huangdi—who had proclaimed himself first emperor of China in 221 BC—lay an extraordinary underground treasure: an entire army of life-size terra cotta soldiers and horses, interred for more than 2,000 years.

odditiesoflife:

The Terra Cotta Soldiers

In March 1974, a group of peasants digging a well in drought-parched Shaanxi province in northwest China unearthed fragments of a clay figure—the first evidence of what would turn out to be one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of modern times. Near the unexcavated tomb of Qin Shi Huangdi—who had proclaimed himself first emperor of China in 221 BC—lay an extraordinary underground treasure: an entire army of life-size terra cotta soldiers and horses, interred for more than 2,000 years.

odditiesoflife:

Capuchin Catacombs - Palermo, Italy

In 1599, Capuchin monks discovered that their catacombs contained a mysterious preservative that helped mummify the dead. As a result, more than 8,000 Sicilians from all walks of life chose to be buried here. The corpses range in date from the late 1500s to 1920 and most were embalmed before their display.

In the 1940s Allied bombs hit the monastery, destroying many of the mummies. The Capuchin Monastery (Convento dei Cappuccini) itself was rebuilt over the remains of the original medieval church in 1623 and was once again restored in the early 20th century.

odditiesoflife:

Capuchin Catacombs - Palermo, Italy

In 1599, Capuchin monks discovered that their catacombs contained a mysterious preservative that helped mummify the dead. As a result, more than 8,000 Sicilians from all walks of life chose to be buried here. The corpses range in date from the late 1500s to 1920 and most were embalmed before their display.

In the 1940s Allied bombs hit the monastery, destroying many of the mummies. The Capuchin Monastery (Convento dei Cappuccini) itself was rebuilt over the remains of the original medieval church in 1623 and was once again restored in the early 20th century.

odditiesoflife:

Picturing Disabilities

  • Dr. Clark’s Spinal Apparatus Advertisement, 1878
  • Artificial Leg Advertisement, 1891
  • Wheelchair Advertisement, 1910 

Midget, feeble-minded, crippled, lame, and insane: these terms and the historical photographs that accompany them may seem shocking to present-day audiences. A young woman with no arms wears a revealing dress and smiles for the camera as she holds a tea cup with her toes; a man holds up two prosthetic legs while his own legs are bared to the knees to show his missing feet.

These photos were used as promotional material for circus sideshows, charity drives, and art galleries. They were found on begging cards and in family albums. In their book Picturing Disabilities, Robert Bogdan and his collaborators gathered over 200 historical photographs showing how people with disabilities have been presented and exploring the contexts in which they were photographed.


Printed advertisement cards
Private collection of Robert Bogdan 
Courtesy of Robert Bogdan

odditiesoflife:

Picturing Disabilities

  • Dr. Clark’s Spinal Apparatus Advertisement, 1878
  • Artificial Leg Advertisement, 1891
  • Wheelchair Advertisement, 1910 

Midget, feeble-minded, crippled, lame, and insane: these terms and the historical photographs that accompany them may seem shocking to present-day audiences. A young woman with no arms wears a revealing dress and smiles for the camera as she holds a tea cup with her toes; a man holds up two prosthetic legs while his own legs are bared to the knees to show his missing feet.

These photos were used as promotional material for circus sideshows, charity drives, and art galleries. They were found on begging cards and in family albums. In their book Picturing Disabilities, Robert Bogdan and his collaborators gathered over 200 historical photographs showing how people with disabilities have been presented and exploring the contexts in which they were photographed.


Printed advertisement cards
Private collection of Robert Bogdan 
Courtesy of Robert Bogdan

toastradamus:

buttgrab:

the-safeword-is-dracula:

striderprovider:

bolinsboo:

razzledazzy:

The photo above is the closest humanity has ever come to creating Medusa. 

If you were to look at this, you would die instantly. End of story.

The image is of a reactor core lava formation in the basement of the Chernobyl nuclear plant. It’s called the Elephant’s Foot and weighs hundreds of tons, but is only a couple meters across.

Oh, and regarding the Medusa thing? This picture was taken through a mirror around the corner of the hallway. Because the wheeled camera they sent up to take pictures of it was destroyed by the radiation

I wonder if they could get pictures in colour now or maybe get an accurate heat reading off of that thing, if it’s still all there.

It’s crazy to think that something can be that strong that it would kill you by just looking at it. Though it’s understandable. I’d like a heat reading off of it.

oh damn i thought this was a mummy at first. it looked like a crushed skull to me, like the very bottom is almost a face… damn ive been reading too much junji ito. but also holy shit this is terrifying and cool

That’s really badass

That’s pretty damn scary

that’s pretty damn awesome

(Source: submariet)

toastradamus:

buttgrab:

the-safeword-is-dracula:

striderprovider:

bolinsboo:

razzledazzy:


The photo above is the closest humanity has ever come to creating Medusa. 
If you were to look at this, you would die instantly. End of story.
The image is of a reactor core lava formation in the basement of the Chernobyl nuclear plant. It’s called the Elephant’s Foot and weighs hundreds of tons, but is only a couple meters across.
Oh, and regarding the Medusa thing? This picture was taken through a mirror around the corner of the hallway. Because the wheeled camera they sent up to take pictures of it was destroyed by the radiation. 

I wonder if they could get pictures in colour now or maybe get an accurate heat reading off of that thing, if it’s still all there.

It’s crazy to think that something can be that strong that it would kill you by just looking at it. Though it’s understandable. I’d like a heat reading off of it.

oh damn i thought this was a mummy at first. it looked like a crushed skull to me, like the very bottom is almost a face… damn ive been reading too much junji ito. but also holy shit this is terrifying and cool

That’s really badass

That’s pretty damn scary

that’s pretty damn awesome

toastradamus:

buttgrab:

the-safeword-is-dracula:

striderprovider:

bolinsboo:

razzledazzy:

The photo above is the closest humanity has ever come to creating Medusa. 

If you were to look at this, you would die instantly. End of story.

The image is of a reactor core lava formation in the basement of the Chernobyl nuclear plant. It’s called the Elephant’s Foot and weighs hundreds of tons, but is only a couple meters across.

Oh, and regarding the Medusa thing? This picture was taken through a mirror around the corner of the hallway. Because the wheeled camera they sent up to take pictures of it was destroyed by the radiation

I wonder if they could get pictures in colour now or maybe get an accurate heat reading off of that thing, if it’s still all there.

It’s crazy to think that something can be that strong that it would kill you by just looking at it. Though it’s understandable. I’d like a heat reading off of it.

oh damn i thought this was a mummy at first. it looked like a crushed skull to me, like the very bottom is almost a face… damn ive been reading too much junji ito. but also holy shit this is terrifying and cool

That’s really badass

That’s pretty damn scary

that’s pretty damn awesome

(Source: submariet)

usb-dongle:

archiemcphee:

MorpHex is an amazingly versatile [and awesome] transforming robot created by Norwegian roboticist Kåre Halvorsen (video). In “standard pose” MorpHex is a 6-legged walking robot, but it can transform into a tripod, rolling sphere, and many other configurations.

Visit Laughing Squid to watch a video of MorpHex in motion!

HOLY SHIt this looks like Aperture technology 

usb-dongle:

archiemcphee:

MorpHex is an amazingly versatile [and awesome] transforming robot created by Norwegian roboticist Kåre Halvorsen (video). In “standard pose” MorpHex is a 6-legged walking robot, but it can transform into a tripod, rolling sphere, and many other configurations.

Visit Laughing Squid to watch a video of MorpHex in motion!

HOLY SHIt this looks like Aperture technology 

Tagged: (science)

(Source: blazeberg)

(Source: blazeberg)

spacemannsays:

If you’ve been to a crowded airport, sporting event, or even a kid’s birthday party lately, a little peace and quiet might sound like the perfect thing to help you kick back and relax. Just don’t let things get too quiet, or you might drive yourself a wee bit insane: the anechoic chamber at Orfield Laboratoriesin Minnesota can mute 99.99% of all sound, but visiting the silent oasis isn’t as calming as you might expect.

The room holds the current Guinness World Record as the quietest place on the planet, and companies from all over the world seek out its unique acoustic properties. The walls of the chamber are lined with sound-absorbing baffles that can capture noise and mute it in an instant. This allows companies — both Whirlpool and Harley-Davidson have visited — to test just how noisy their products are without the risk of outside interference.

But while the super-silent oasis is a great testbed for various products, it holds a darker side: silence, it turns out, can put a great strain on the human brain. Researchers at NASA test the room’s unique acoustic capabilities on humans rather than hardware. The noiselessness is used to simulate the silence of space — an environment astronauts would be well served to grow accustomed to.

What they’ve found is that when all outside noise is removed from an enclosure, human hearing will do its best to find something to listen to. In a room where almost 100% of sound is muted, people begin to hear things like their own heartbeat at a greatly amplified volume. As the minutes tick by in absolute quiet, the human mind begins to lose its grip, causing test subjects to hallucinate.

NASA then monitors how the would-be space explorers react, and whether they can get past the very obvious awkwardness of seeing or hearing things that aren’t actually there. According to lab officials, the longest anyone has lasted is 45 minutes before being allowed to hear the sweet sounds of planet Earth once again.

In the end, the chamber has proven a valuable scientific tool, just don’t plan on renting it for some peace and quiet — it may do more harm than good.

spacemannsays:

If you’ve been to a crowded airport, sporting event, or even a kid’s birthday party lately, a little peace and quiet might sound like the perfect thing to help you kick back and relax. Just don’t let things get too quiet, or you might drive yourself a wee bit insane: the anechoic chamber at Orfield Laboratoriesin Minnesota can mute 99.99% of all sound, but visiting the silent oasis isn’t as calming as you might expect.
The room holds the current Guinness World Record as the quietest place on the planet, and companies from all over the world seek out its unique acoustic properties. The walls of the chamber are lined with sound-absorbing baffles that can capture noise and mute it in an instant. This allows companies — both Whirlpool and Harley-Davidson have visited — to test just how noisy their products are without the risk of outside interference.
But while the super-silent oasis is a great testbed for various products, it holds a darker side: silence, it turns out, can put a great strain on the human brain. Researchers at NASA test the room’s unique acoustic capabilities on humans rather than hardware. The noiselessness is used to simulate the silence of space — an environment astronauts would be well served to grow accustomed to.
What they’ve found is that when all outside noise is removed from an enclosure, human hearing will do its best to find something to listen to. In a room where almost 100% of sound is muted, people begin to hear things like their own heartbeat at a greatly amplified volume. As the minutes tick by in absolute quiet, the human mind begins to lose its grip, causing test subjects to hallucinate.
NASA then monitors how the would-be space explorers react, and whether they can get past the very obvious awkwardness of seeing or hearing things that aren’t actually there. According to lab officials, the longest anyone has lasted is 45 minutes before being allowed to hear the sweet sounds of planet Earth once again.
In the end, the chamber has proven a valuable scientific tool, just don’t plan on renting it for some peace and quiet — it may do more harm than good.

spacemannsays:

If you’ve been to a crowded airport, sporting event, or even a kid’s birthday party lately, a little peace and quiet might sound like the perfect thing to help you kick back and relax. Just don’t let things get too quiet, or you might drive yourself a wee bit insane: the anechoic chamber at Orfield Laboratoriesin Minnesota can mute 99.99% of all sound, but visiting the silent oasis isn’t as calming as you might expect.

The room holds the current Guinness World Record as the quietest place on the planet, and companies from all over the world seek out its unique acoustic properties. The walls of the chamber are lined with sound-absorbing baffles that can capture noise and mute it in an instant. This allows companies — both Whirlpool and Harley-Davidson have visited — to test just how noisy their products are without the risk of outside interference.

But while the super-silent oasis is a great testbed for various products, it holds a darker side: silence, it turns out, can put a great strain on the human brain. Researchers at NASA test the room’s unique acoustic capabilities on humans rather than hardware. The noiselessness is used to simulate the silence of space — an environment astronauts would be well served to grow accustomed to.

What they’ve found is that when all outside noise is removed from an enclosure, human hearing will do its best to find something to listen to. In a room where almost 100% of sound is muted, people begin to hear things like their own heartbeat at a greatly amplified volume. As the minutes tick by in absolute quiet, the human mind begins to lose its grip, causing test subjects to hallucinate.

NASA then monitors how the would-be space explorers react, and whether they can get past the very obvious awkwardness of seeing or hearing things that aren’t actually there. According to lab officials, the longest anyone has lasted is 45 minutes before being allowed to hear the sweet sounds of planet Earth once again.

In the end, the chamber has proven a valuable scientific tool, just don’t plan on renting it for some peace and quiet — it may do more harm than good.